Moving

Hi all, I’ve decided to start fresh, but didn’t want to delete this blog entirely. You may find my shiny new blog (that I’m still setting up and haven’t written a post on yet) at wildwaterscorchedearth.wordpress.com

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I’m tired. I know that’s not news, being a spoonie and all. Just, it’s at the forefront of my mind most days. That I am just so tired.

Last week my kid took a book off my shelf. This isn’t new, she seems oddly fascinated by my Japanese textbooks and workbooks, and I’ll frequently find them scattered about the floor. Maybe she’ll mix things up by grabbing a couple novels.

This time she took one book, brought it into the livingroom, sat it in front of me on the table and walked off to play with something completely unrelated. It was literally the only religious paperback on my shelf. Grace and Mercy in Her Wild Hair, a book of poetry from the 18th century Indian poet Ramaprasad Sen.

I’ve been meaning to read it since I bought it, but it was a little startling. One of my friends warned me that the Hindu gods are really obvious, but uh, wasn’t quite expecting someone to hand my 2 year old a book while I wasn’t looking. My daughter hasn’t had any interest in my book shelf since!

It’s a good book. Not long by any sense, 65 pages of poems, but they are definitely the sort that speak to you. Relatable content, as it were. There are a lot that essentially go “hey ma, wtf, are you even paying attention, I need help and I know I can win with your help!”

That’s kinda how I”m feeling. Just in general, much less health and financial-wise. I had more to say but my brain is just rolling in fog.

 

Who is devotion for?

The Road, the Walker, and What Comes Next

Devotion, as it is applied to pagan and particularly to polytheist religious engagement, is characterized as intensely loving, passionate, and may have the features of romantic love. Devotional practice – the expression of these feelings in behaviors, actions, decisions, thoughts, and problem solving within a distinctly religious context – is characterized as similarly passionate; after all, devotional practice rises out of these intense sentiments, right?

No.

Not necessarily.

Some of the discussion surrounding the boundaries that delineate devotional practice and devotional engagement from other types of polytheist religious practice erroneously assume that action follows sentiment, that one’s religious inclinations and behaviors arise from emotions that are already present within the worshiper.

This model of emotion preceding action is, perhaps, cultural; certainly this model is based in the way we culturally imagine the experience of love. That feeling, that spark, leaps up inside the body without us asking it to; something…

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